Author Topic: What book are you reading? And what does it do to you?  (Read 106718 times)

WalkAbout Offline fr

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« Reply #720 on: November 15, 2015, 08:42:58 »
And damn painful it turned out to be. Had to force myself to read it through, even though it's a light read, winced, glanced away, all that stuff, yet couldn't help but return back to it. Christ, I deleted the book from my phone once I finished it, it's unbearable, I need to distil all this. Gave it 4 out of 5. Just because.

Here go some screenshots of the book I took where she defines what Hope is (in blue color). I found it particularly interesting in the light of the Hoffnung cover, with that look "Give me the path or don't give me the path I'll make one myself". This is rather interesting.



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Sunny Offline ua

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« Reply #721 on: November 15, 2015, 15:43:37 »
Okay. I bought it occasionally. Although, naturally I've heard of it before. I've never watched the film, and, to be honest, I doubt that I will after reading the book, because...

Yes, it is Jane Eyre-ish. It's thrilling. It's haunting.
There's some pretension to mysticism. Just some of it.
But I even like it this way, for ghosts while being on the background of the tale for all the time, enter it just occasionally, with a light touch, never too insistently.
It is a Gothic story, although not a "proper", not classic one. While having all the necessary attributes, the story feels a lack of... non-reality.
And here again there's another "while": While, reading it, you realize how fictional the plot is, the tale is thrilling enough to make you forget about that.
The overall atmosphere is oppressing. There are quite a few of repelling things described - to my deepest astonishment, to be honest, for it's a bit shocking to read about such things in perfect English, non-slang, non-dialect, and to stumble on them among the finely craved narrative.
The only thing that really is mystified here is that strange and closer than closest connection between siblings, all of them.
But, however artificial it looks, it doesn't spoil the tale.
I'm still not sure what exact assessment I'll give it. I'm still in the middle of reading it :)
It's thrilling, yes. It's a page-turner.
But the book has no power to change anything in me.
Yet I will carefully avoid watching the film, for I don't want to spoil the charm of the perfect language, the depth and richness of descriptions and some mystic veil hiding you from the world while you're immersed in your reading.
     

... nothing ever comes of nothing - we pay a price for all our choices made © Sean Brennan

Yasmin Nurmi Offline br

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Antw:What book are you reading? And what does it do to you?
« Reply #722 on: December 24, 2015, 08:41:36 »
I love Neil Gaiman novels *__*
Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn't thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she'd claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

I was somewhat surprised to see that "The Ocean at the End of the Lane" has been discussed as a book for adults which children can also read. When I thought about it, I realised that I am an adult reading self, and also a child reader, and that it was my childhood self who settled into this story. I am an adult who reads "children's" books avidly – as long as they have no designs on me, do not manoeuvre me or preach.
I hope you enjoy this wonderful book, such as me! ^^


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Fernanda Alves Offline br

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« Reply #723 on: January 07, 2016, 20:05:20 »
It's a classical book and I didn't read it yet. Shame on me. Actually, I have bought it has almost 3 years, but I never found time enough to read it. I read before, stopped, restart reading all again, stopped, started over... I tried many times.

I'm trying to read it all... But now House of Cards is trying to steal my small free time too!

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Asphodel Offline ru

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« Reply #724 on: January 07, 2016, 20:37:39 »
I'm kind of proud to know that books by Dostoevsky are considered classical and are read even in such distant (from Russia) countries like yours, Fernanda  :)
I admit that he can be difficult to read. I've read his books in school of course, but didn't re-read since then.

Fernanda Alves Offline br

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« Reply #725 on: January 08, 2016, 14:37:00 »
I'm kind of proud to know that books by Dostoevsky are considered classical and are read even in such distant (from Russia) countries like yours, Fernanda  :)
I admit that he can be difficult to read. I've read his books in school of course, but didn't re-read since then.

Well, the writing is very formal, I do like it. Sometimes it's hard because there's not how to translate some things, then I have to stop reading the story and read the footnotes to understand what it means.  It breaks the rhythm, but the story is quite interesting... I've spent the last 5 years just reading law books, so it's good to read a good story and feel the emotions. The next one will be The Process (I think this is the translated name) by Franz Kafka. This one was recommended during the college. Then I'll return to Dostoevsky: The Karamazov Brothers, The Idiot...

And you have the right to be proud! Dostoevsky's books are well-known here. 
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Arkana Offline ru

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« Reply #726 on: January 18, 2016, 17:19:48 »
I also glad to know that Dostoevsky is famous outside Russia.  :)

As for me I'm still reading Terry Goodkind's "Wizard's rules". Almost finished 9 of 14.  :)

A breath-taking fantasy story! And during reading I understood that the main thought of every book is very good life rule.
Here are the 9th rules I've already known:
1. People are stupid. They believe things mainly because they either want them to be true or fear them to be true. (Wizard's First Rule)
2. Harm can result from good intention. (Stone of Tears)
3. Passion rules reason. (Blood of the Fold)
4. There is Magic in Forgiveness, both in forgiveness received and given. (Temple of the Winds)
5. Mind people's actions over words. (Soul of the Fire)
6. Only allow reason to rule you. (Faith of the Fallen)
7. Life is the future not the past. (Pillars of Creation)
8. Deserve victory. (Naked Empire)
9. Contradictions don't exist. (Chainfire)
The time has no power over heart full of love, soul full of faith and music full of senses.

WalkAbout Offline fr

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« Reply #727 on: February 17, 2016, 03:52:21 »


In the middle of the book, it is quite revealing, can't stop from seeing some connection between his boom-bast theory and black swans by Nassim Taleb. At least the grounds for mistakes/omissions in seeing boom-bast/black swans seem to be similar, if not the same: the unpredictability of reality and our flaw to accept that human perception is vastly limited, so we never can just 'see' reality as it is. (I try to detach my feelings while reading, but it doesn't help much in avoiding understanding that I was very, very wrong with my personal idea that everything can be explained, and what can't, it just does not truly exist)
It always looks like a straight line outside when everything is bent inside.

WalkAbout Offline fr

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« Reply #728 on: March 12, 2016, 12:08:15 »
My precious came! I hope for revelations! Going to read it while I'm on my vacations

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Sternenruferin Offline de

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« Reply #729 on: March 12, 2016, 12:14:55 »
Actually I'm reading Friedrich (Damals war es Friedrich) *klick*

With all the racism hate in Germany these days, i'm sensitized for this. I cannot look away, similar what happens!

WalkAbout Offline fr

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« Reply #730 on: April 25, 2016, 16:54:15 »

Finished this one, in a different time and place and even country this book was recommended to me by a then friend and now an acquaintance I almost lost all touch with... have been reading it quite grudgingly at times, but it kind of forced me to define many things I believe in, and to think of other perspectives and views... I think this is a worthy read.
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Fannie Offline mx

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« Reply #731 on: June 07, 2016, 01:10:49 »
I just finished reading The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. It is a beautiful and truly magical story, I liked it a lot and I really recommend it  ;)


Asphodel Offline ru

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« Reply #732 on: June 20, 2016, 23:43:52 »
Currently I'm reading...



Everyone was saying to me, that I should read this or watch the movies. I always said that i didn't want and wasn't going to, because i don't like too much blood and I don't like it when my fav characters die. (And also I resist it when there's too much hype over a book or a movie.) But everyone around kept on saying this. I mean, my friends whose opinions are trustworthy to me. Then one evening I was bored and picked up this book...
I just began, the book (even one, although there are several) is pretty long, but I'm taking it in small pieces and I'm quite enjoying. The author creates vivid images, the change of scenes makes it exciting. I don't regret that I started to read, now I see why so many people are into it. I'm not a mad fan but i think it's worthy of reading... But yeah, I often feel sorry when something happens with the characters that I like. There is quite some cruelty there, but it's about middle-ages-like world... so it's no wonder. I heard a recommendation about reading this book - just don't get too attached to characters. That's true. So I read it as an interesting story.

WalkAbout Offline fr

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« Reply #733 on: July 07, 2016, 07:41:35 »
I'm in the middle of


and as I read it in French, it takes longer than usual. Anyway, haven't read a detective story (not sure, but it seems so) since high school, a nice & easy read, very useful for broadening one's mind and French vocabulary (though it feels sad to read about murders -- haven't read fiction in a while now, it all seems way too true --> depressing).   
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WalkAbout Offline fr

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« Reply #734 on: July 14, 2016, 10:25:57 »
 ;D and now in the middle of Giambattista Basile's Tale of Tales (a middle ages' forefather of fairy tales of Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Rapunzel, etc... ) It is VERY middle ages. People were MUCH different then from now :) Lots of grotesque and cruel fantasy...

It always looks like a straight line outside when everything is bent inside.